Dyvergent Change Makers

Episode 12: Interview with Leena Mendoza, Founder of Intentional Leadership

May 28, 2021 Kerry D. Rosado Season 2 Episode 12
Dyvergent Change Makers
Episode 12: Interview with Leena Mendoza, Founder of Intentional Leadership
Chapters
Dyvergent Change Makers
Episode 12: Interview with Leena Mendoza, Founder of Intentional Leadership
May 28, 2021 Season 2 Episode 12
Kerry D. Rosado

In episode 12, I interview Leena Mendoza, the Founder of Intentional Leadership.  She is also an Executive and Entrepreneurial Coach.  Join us as we discuss leadership and the challenges that come with it. 

About Guest
Leena Mendoza, Founder, Executive & Entrepreneurial Coach
Intentional Leadership - www.leenamendoza.com

Leena is a Business Strategist and Leadership Coach.  She helps women and BIPOC with Entrepreneurial and Executive Leadership. She guides high-performing leaders with her knowledge, skills, and tools to accelerate their development into the executive ranks for increasing optimal business performance. Her program provides culturally relevant strategies that allow executive leadership participants to step into leadership roles and promote the value of bicultural influence.  She teaches empowering leadership to become influential change agent leaders who can align their organization’s business initiatives with social responsibility participation.  

She is a Keynote speaker and corporate trainer. She has over 20 years of experience working in non-profit, government, private sector, and higher education. She became an entrepreneur motivating thousands of people to take charge of their life and live intentionally. Her educational background includes a Masters in Science in Counseling, a Bachelors of Science in Health Science, and a minor in Gerontology and Criminology. Intentional Leadership provides transformational growth through education, empowerment, and engagement.

About the Host
Kerry Rosado, Founder & Principal DEI Consultant
Dyvergent Consulting Group, LLC - www.dyvergentcg.com 

Kerry is the Founder and Principal Diversity Consultant of Dyvergent Consulting Group, LLC. Named among the 146 Inspiring Women Leaders in 2021 by Diverse IN. She is an elected official serving as a school board trustee with 7 years of diversity and inclusion experience in tech, healthcare, and education. She is a proud mother of two boys with autism and a neurodiversity advocate.  She is a Latina in Tech that has worked at top tech companies such as Microsoft and Amazon to advocate for diversity and inclusion to empower women and minorities.​

She is a former board member for People Acting in Community Together (PACT), where she empowered the community to solve social issues related to housing, immigration, education, and social justice. She led community rallies to advocate for equitable education for all. Mentored youth through Google's CS First Program and Microsoft TEALS Program, and led and won hackathons at Women Who Code Silicon Valley.  She holds a Masters in Business Administration, a Bachelors of Science in Computer Science, and a DEI in the Workplace Certification.

Learn more at www.dyvergentcg.com or schedule a call at calendly.com/dyvergentcg.

Podcast Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/podcastdyvergentchangemakers

Youtube Channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJmzVICfMuyp41W1_y8bi6A/featured

Podcast Guests  - Schedule a pre-interview at calendly.com/dyvergentcg

How to Get Started with D&I - 6/4/21
Register at Eventbrite - https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ask-me-anything-about-how-to-get-started-with-diversity-and-inclusion-tickets-156156234501

Gifts for Listeners:
Get a free $15 gift card from Amphy at https://www.amphy.com/gift/dyvergent.  Amphy is the largest marketplace for live classes, connecting and enriching humanity through knowledge.

Show Notes Transcript

In episode 12, I interview Leena Mendoza, the Founder of Intentional Leadership.  She is also an Executive and Entrepreneurial Coach.  Join us as we discuss leadership and the challenges that come with it. 

About Guest
Leena Mendoza, Founder, Executive & Entrepreneurial Coach
Intentional Leadership - www.leenamendoza.com

Leena is a Business Strategist and Leadership Coach.  She helps women and BIPOC with Entrepreneurial and Executive Leadership. She guides high-performing leaders with her knowledge, skills, and tools to accelerate their development into the executive ranks for increasing optimal business performance. Her program provides culturally relevant strategies that allow executive leadership participants to step into leadership roles and promote the value of bicultural influence.  She teaches empowering leadership to become influential change agent leaders who can align their organization’s business initiatives with social responsibility participation.  

She is a Keynote speaker and corporate trainer. She has over 20 years of experience working in non-profit, government, private sector, and higher education. She became an entrepreneur motivating thousands of people to take charge of their life and live intentionally. Her educational background includes a Masters in Science in Counseling, a Bachelors of Science in Health Science, and a minor in Gerontology and Criminology. Intentional Leadership provides transformational growth through education, empowerment, and engagement.

About the Host
Kerry Rosado, Founder & Principal DEI Consultant
Dyvergent Consulting Group, LLC - www.dyvergentcg.com 

Kerry is the Founder and Principal Diversity Consultant of Dyvergent Consulting Group, LLC. Named among the 146 Inspiring Women Leaders in 2021 by Diverse IN. She is an elected official serving as a school board trustee with 7 years of diversity and inclusion experience in tech, healthcare, and education. She is a proud mother of two boys with autism and a neurodiversity advocate.  She is a Latina in Tech that has worked at top tech companies such as Microsoft and Amazon to advocate for diversity and inclusion to empower women and minorities.​

She is a former board member for People Acting in Community Together (PACT), where she empowered the community to solve social issues related to housing, immigration, education, and social justice. She led community rallies to advocate for equitable education for all. Mentored youth through Google's CS First Program and Microsoft TEALS Program, and led and won hackathons at Women Who Code Silicon Valley.  She holds a Masters in Business Administration, a Bachelors of Science in Computer Science, and a DEI in the Workplace Certification.

Learn more at www.dyvergentcg.com or schedule a call at calendly.com/dyvergentcg.

Podcast Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/podcastdyvergentchangemakers

Youtube Channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJmzVICfMuyp41W1_y8bi6A/featured

Podcast Guests  - Schedule a pre-interview at calendly.com/dyvergentcg

How to Get Started with D&I - 6/4/21
Register at Eventbrite - https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ask-me-anything-about-how-to-get-started-with-diversity-and-inclusion-tickets-156156234501

Gifts for Listeners:
Get a free $15 gift card from Amphy at https://www.amphy.com/gift/dyvergent.  Amphy is the largest marketplace for live classes, connecting and enriching humanity through knowledge.

Host - Kerry Rosado:

Hello everyone, this is Kerry D Rosado. I'm the host of divergent changemakers podcast. I'm also the founder and diversity consultant of Dyvergent Consulting Group LLC. Coming to you today, just reminding you that the focus of our podcast is to design awareness, raise awareness of the importance of the I diversity, equity, inclusion and belonging. We focus on the challenges that come with this work and how to stay motivated, and how DEI can actually lead to retention, innovation and productivity. We also target issues related to allyship, bias, women empowerment, support for LGBTQ people with disabilities and much more. I highly encourage you to check out our website, www.dyvergentcg.com if you need support with D&I initiatives, we provide inclusive leadership training, training for employees online courses and strategies to help you be successful. In addition, I encourage you to check out our new YouTube channel that complements our our podcast, it's called divergent changemakers. It's available on YouTube, you can find a link on our website. It contains all the podcast recordings and the recordings of our most recent summit. In addition, I encourage you to attend we have an upcoming event on June 4, which is a Friday at 9am Pacific Standard Time, where we discuss how you can get started with D&I. So it's a very important topic, I highly encourage you to check it out. You can find the link in the notes for this podcast. And you can register at Eventbrite. Enjoy the intro music and this week's episode. Thank you for listening. Welcome, everyone. My name is Kerry D Rosado. I'm the host of divergent changemakers, which is available on Spotify, Apple podcast, Google, and also Amazo music. I'm also the Fo nder of Dyvergent Consulting Gr up, LLC. Today, our gues is Leena Mendoza. She is the ounder of intentional leade ship. And welcome Leena. Go ah ad and let us give us a litt e bit more about your backgro nd and how you got involved in leade

Guest - Leena Mendoza:

Absolutely. So thank you, Carrie, thank you for having this platform. I'm honored to be here to you know, to speak with you and really have a candid conversation about leadership. And I think also like leadership for people of color. And so I think it's something that's not only just a trending topic, but also I think you're in dear to both of our hearts. And so we've seen some things in corporate America and the private sector, there really hasn't necessarily opened, you know, opened the doors for us in that way, right. And so, intentional leadership was founded roughly a year ago as the pandemic hit. And unbeknownst to me, I didn't know that the pendant of it was a week out. And I'm glad that I still continue to do it and run my organization this way. Because what I continue to find in research was that people of color were not advancing, you know, into executive leadership and senior leadership, and even in management. And so there's a lot of pain points around that, and revert to their current career trajectory, and like how we advance so it's women and people of color. And then also intrapreneurs, when we were finding that, you know, the financial aspect of it, the business acumen, and then also what resources were needed for entrepreneurs to be successful. So capital is one of the most important resources but not the only, definitely finding that that financial argument was a missing piece. So my line of work is really focused on advancing people of color and women into the, into those executive spaces, but also into the entrepreneurial space. And so I'll continue to do that here on out. And then what I found was confidence was also a missing piece. And so as I continued doing that, until, as I really focused on I said, what is what is happening and so imposter syndrome was part of it. And some people don't believe that imposter syndrome is real, but it's like, Am I good enough? Do what am i equipped for? what's ahead. So that's just a normal, like feeling of uncertainty. So I say isn't imposter syndrome, or is it feelings of doubt and uncertainty, a little bit of nervousness, and so oftentimes, it's courage. And so we show up anyways with that sense of fear. And then we just execute accordingly. And so I love what I do. I love serving our community. And I think it's very important that we continue to have these kinds of conversations around what is helping us and what is hurting us advance and then and now it almost it's just interesting how It is like highly encouraged us for the authentic to be bring our whole self. But still, we don't feel that that is very true and that we can exercise that opportunity. So I'm very grateful to be here.

Host - Kerry Rosado:

Well, thank you for sharing your background and expertise. And also you recently were a speaker at our virtual DNI summit where you got to speak on leadership as well. So grateful for that. Thank you for highlighting the imposter syndrome piece. Can you tell us more about that as far as how an individual can identify that in themselves? And then once they identify it? What can they do about it to kind of overcome it? Absolutely.

Guest - Leena Mendoza:

So imposter syndrome is when someone experiences that where am I good enough? Am I qualified? Am I in you know, like a poser? Right? So it's kind of a slang term writers or am I being fake? And so actually, it was a millennial who described you ever have imposter syndrome. And they asked me that is COVID hit and I'm like, I don't feel like I'm fake. So he's Let me read the definition to you. So I'm a huge like diction, you know, Queen, where I love that if the definition of word because it really is provides a lot of clarity. So as he read that to me, I said, Oh, yeah, that happens all the time. And so I do feel like am I in the right space, too, I have to fake it right. And so I just don't use the word fake it. And so we even encourage each other, sometimes fake it till you make it. And so it's true, right, and definitely show up in our wholesale. So the technique, I would encourage us really, constantly working, flexing our confidence muscle every day, reminding ourselves of the skill set that we bring the talent in genius that we have. Because it's skills, knowledge and ability that gets us through college and gets us to our jobs. But as we build our current jerk career trajectory, it's really the skills matrix that we continue to build upon that. And then also, we are, you know, valued more because of the talent and genius. So, as I met with more corporate leaders, they're like, oh, we're looking for something specific. I go, Oh, you're looking for talents and gifts? And they said, Yes, we are, I said, you have to pay for that. And they said, That's not a problem. And that's not something that we're really privy to, or we even understand, we maybe have been discouraged by parents or family members that said, Oh, you know, hey, Carrie, you don't need to do that photography, you're not gonna make a living out of that. But as you advance in your career, maybe you learn how to digitize, you know, photographs, and really create something different. And so, but they weren't really in that, that realm to understand to kind of share how to put those pieces together. So, imposter syndrome can creep up, especially when you're around people who you view or prospectively through that use case, that lens and I say, always look at someone else's perspective. So you and your own, and you might think, oh, gosh, they're so professional, they're very well seasoned. And it's like, well, you forgot to look at yourself and say, you know what I am to like, you, you're probably more qualified or equally qualified. And so, and oftentimes, you're gonna find that you're more qualified, but because they showed up differently, so you got to check your own, you know, reasons why you're having those assumptions. Right. And so, you know, so as COVID head, I share this, because there was a gentleman showed up, and he got on a zoom call. And, you know, I was very proud of my home office. And so, and so I didn't get intimidated by that, or he didn't feel that imposter syndrome. And that way, you know, he goes to this, okay, for today, this is my office and I, and what I thought to myself was like, Oh, I need to vote. I need to level up, up something. I love these, you know, pictures behind me, you know, like my office and the framework. I was like, Look, I have a home office. And I was like, Whoa, I need a home office on water, new levels. someone's like, got it. And so is this some you got to remember, just you got to remember your your skill set. And honestly, I think we forget that. And we think oh, you know, they're they have their vice president right? Maybe it's a title then to me, maybe it's a doctor, it's or an educational level. But I'm telling you, I mean, a lot of intelligent people, a lot of talented people, and they don't necessarily have all that and it's like it's this bring yourself and so don't always look at the other person or everyone else in the room as smarter and better look at yourself like the I'm here for a reason. So I think it's constantly exercising that confidence muscle. Also reminding yourself of what you do bring to the table, the value you bring to the table. And then be unapologetically you and so I don't always hear the word economic advancement. Sometimes I just say it's slang and I say secure the bag. I'm here to secure the back. And then they just go and I go I they look at me. And so typically, those are on the zoom call or in the room and they go, did you want me to say like economic growth? And they said, No, we are or what you mean? I said, Okay, well, we're clear. They no power through. And so I just, I'm not gonna necessarily accommodate other people in that way, because of the way I speak or my emphasis on something. And so, and no one asked me to necessarily shrink in that way. And if they do, I'm not in the right room, because I'm not going to shrink. We're there for a reason together. And so it's bringing that perspective together, right? And really collaborating on And then also is making sure that you continue to create these collaborative partnerships so that they can help bring that you know, that confidence with you. Because I think having alliances and strategic partnerships really gives you a lot of power and really gives you a really remind you to have your global competency. And so because I know you've carried who worked with corporate America, and then you're on your own now, and it's like, oh, she is not messing around she is and then you know, finding out you're one of the very few Latinas in the Bay Area, who is, you know, a DI expert. And so that's not, that's not an easy feat. And so, I think that's something very proud, you know, you should be very proud of, and you know, and claim that. And so, I'm one of five Latinas and stuff, claiming that most definitely. And so you got it. Sometimes you just got to be your own champion, and be like, I'm amazing. You're welcome. And I say that to others. And they're like, do you tell people that I go sometimes, because they they're checking my credentials, and I'm like, I didn't get invited, because because of the certain credentials, I got invited, because I'm good at what I do. And so I just remind them, like, you're not going to check that at the door, like you're going to I'm already I'm already overqualified. So be very careful with your next question. You know, so at times, when I have to flex that muscle of like, beat, you know, then I kind of use that assertiveness as necessary. And sometimes for women and people of color, we think assertiveness is aggression. And so we all show up differently. And so I definitely had different experiences. So I have a tendency to show up a little bit more confidently or a little bit more assertive. Or somebody will may say, she's a very strong woman. And so however you want to say it, but I've been I've had different experiences. And I think also you could be a peaceful person and still have that power. I've seen women and people of color navigate that way, as well, and have a very strong sense of power, but they are more quiet. And so it's just however you show up.

Host - Kerry Rosado:

I really appreciate you highlighting that and how we can flex that muscle and how it's important to really show up, but show up authentically. So it really depends, like you mentioned on the personality. Others have just a stronger personality than others, but they're still displaying leadership in their own way. So thank you for highlighting that. And your experience. What have you seen the challenges that leadership is currently having, especially now with the pandemic? And even prior to the pandemic? What would you say are the biggest challenges leaders are currently facing overall?

Guest - Leena Mendoza:

I think during a pandemic, and pre COVID, I think definitely what I saw of leaders is having not really having a sense of who their team members are, and in a sense of reality, and so as COVID hit, I just was like floored how leaders were saying it, we're going to be honest, in two weeks, I'm like seeing your or your doctor, or your Nobel Peace Prize, I mean, please tell me how you are very well aware of our exit plan. And I just think we should build like what's ahead together, right. And so I spoke with a university recently, and they said, Oh, you know, we're going back, you know, as you know, we're going back to work and looking at a hybrid model. And so I said, Let's, let's remember how we kind of got in a mess in the beginning, as certain leaders were sharing like, this is what's going to happen, we're going to get a COVID in two weeks. And this is a global pandemic. And so it's okay to say, I don't know, let's build what's ahead together. And so in really getting to know your team, because I mean, a lot of people were suffering, they didn't know what to do. They're panicking. Do we wear a mask? Or do we not? And so but even before COVID hit, I mean, it was things like that people didn't? Like, how do you not know that your team member owns 10 houses? Like, he works here for benefits? Like he's not here, because he earns money? And I'm like, he's a real estate investor. And they're like, Oh, we just thought he was a mechanic. And I'm like, No, it's just for the benefits. And so, you know, I had a sense, I like to create community. And you know, also because I work in emergency situations. I also want to know your name, if I'm pulling you out of a fire, and I want you to pull me out of the fire site. Because people go, what do you do I go, just just know my name. And we got to connect, and they say, you know, doesn't matter what my title is, because if there is an emergency, please pull out the Asian American Girl. I'm like, I am that girl. And so, and they laugh, and they go, you know what, it doesn't matter what titles are like no, get to know people. And I think that's the missing piece of leaders is that people part is right, as they're so focused on performance measures. But imagine if you really took a step further to get to know your team members, and what motivates what D motivates you know, what their concerns are? Definitely, the pandemic has caused so much chaos and so much fear, and a lot of death. I mean, I definitely experienced that quite a bit. And so even people were like, I'm sorry, I'm late, you know, I was at a funeral. I'm like, Oh, my gosh, no apologies. And just really meeting people where they're at and extending that mercy and grace. And so I can tell you what leaders have done quite well through COVID, which is they're much nicer. People are like, how can I help you? I'm like, how are we going to be like this covered after COVID? I really hope so. And so I think leaders really Have to get to get the pulse of their team, right and really know, what drives them and what's important to them. And I definitely know that family's important. And so, and making sure that they're getting what they need. And so it's not just about performance metrics. Even I've heard in a conversation around diversity, equity inclusion, what is the what is the ROI? And so if I can extend that, and so in this, so this gentleman said, What is the return of investment and so it was really awesome to hear a majority of the leaders in there going we don't, we're not here to talk about like, Don't even talk about the return of investment, talk about the return of inclusion, we're here for people not for profits, like, it's very important that we make the changes now, and how we see things and how we do business and in businesses of all people. So to see people to see companies really leading that way is very powerful. I recently heard, Samsung, Vice President of Samsung share, like we focus on two things is that we we love her, we love our team members, and then also that they're healthy and okay. And so I was like, really? Yeah, she's like, always, and I was like, oh, and that's a very, like, adamant across the board, and so didn't mean any of her lead or her team members. But I definitely can hear the sincerity and authenticity in her voice. So that was awesome.

Host - Kerry Rosado:

Oh, that sounds amazing. Thank you for sharing that. And I'm glad that Samsung is taking those steps forward and being so proactive and supporting their employees. That's actually really great. And I'm glad that leaders are starting to see the value and be more inclusive, I think I really do hope that the results of the pandemic are positive going forward. And this this work continues because I know it can be a challenge for organizations to implement DNI. So, um, so what would be your recommendations for someone who is looking to get into leadership, perhaps they're not quite there yet. Maybe they're still an individual contributor, and maybe they want to go and start moving in that direction? What were commendations, which you give us far as what steps they should be taking?

Guest - Leena Mendoza:

Absolutely, I love talking about leadership, because it's, it's really about servant serving others, right. And so a lot of times people think leadership is about titles. So wait, so my personal definition of leadership is leading with through humbleness and humility. And so that's also a way for me to identify if my team has the same shared value. So sometimes when they asked me to either an interview that definition, and then I can tell if they know me, how they react, like I that's my, that's my definition, I'm like, Oh, we have the same shared value, we're cut from the same cloth. And so it's a great way for me to know what their, their moral compass is, as well. And so leadership is, is really about serving where you're at. And so in, when we advance into different positions in an organization, the most important thing I would say the first steps, I would say, is to interview other people who serve in that role. And so if they're in a human resources role, right, there's different aspects. It's not just one role. And so I learned as of yesterday, that human resources is now taking a big part of educational role as well, with the diversity, equity inclusion. And so, and then also, like, I've heard other HR representatives say, we don't like payroll. And so I'm like, why? So I think it's important to ask, and, you know, and then checking with other professionals, what do you do? Why do you do that? What do you not like? Some people, I remember asking a gentleman and like, why do you work here, and he goes, because I get hella paid. And I'm like, oh, and I'm like, really, he goes, and he goes in for everybody else is sitting in the room saying they feel good about their job. That's a lie. Because we all get hella paid. So let's be honest. And so I was like, I don't know what to say about that. And so, and he's like, Sure, yeah, you feel good. He's like, but we do get compensated quite well. So we are here for the check. And so I mean, you know, it depends on your value. And is that important to you? Asking that, right, is that, you know, also when you're interviewing other people, like getting to know them and stay connected, right. And so as we build these networks, it's really about building those relationships, and also providing value, right, and then being open to being being mentored. And so as you ask that, so you're connecting, asking for information or interviews, maybe ask getting one or two other mentors, so they can kind of guide you along that, you know, career pathway. And so it's like, and they can also give you some feedback going, Hey, I really see that you're really great with working as a business partner, right? Or you're really great at working with employees, or you're very good at resource management. And so because sometimes we can't see our own gifts, so when we can hear that feedback, or, you know, hey, you have a tendency to get mad really quick. So you might want to work on the emotional intelligence piece, right? And so you're like, really, I don't, I don't know what you're talking about. You're like, uh, I can't hear it in your tone. And so really, and then not all mentors are created created equal, if I can share that and so sometimes mentors may be great and in your career, but they might not have great financial responsibility. So meaning they don't manage own money. So if you're, that's something important to you, then you want to find mentor in the area of financial management. So when I remember sharing that with someone, they were like, oh, wow, I didn't think about that I go, Well, there's different mentors for different reasons. But definitely in your career, you want to have a couple of seasoned, those were seasoned in their field. But don't be opposed to someone who's younger, I've had plenty of young people mentor me, I will take notes, learn and absorb, and I will get it together. And so I'm not opposed to that. And so, and then also, it's helpful when someone is at the same rate, racial background or ethnic background. But I think it's also important to, again, open those perspectives, you know, you know, it could be a different gender, it could be a, you know, different, you know, race, and so could be a different generation, there's like five or six generations in the workforce. So getting that different, different scope of, of work that people are doing, but also that different lens of where they're at in perspective. And so sometimes that saying of this is how we used to do it as well, we always end it doesn't necessarily is a bad thing, it could mean that these are the traditional ways we've done it, and they have traditional mindset learn from that, what worked from that, and what didn't work from that. And so, and then also just constantly being that learning and development stage and learning and growth. And so I think it's important to read, I think, you know, I think if people go are you saying I can't speak English, I'm like no means read the information you can get into podcasting and YouTube, I think that knowledge acquisition is different ways, right? You can also, you know, use Audible, the library is a great resource, there's a lot of free books you can get there, you can check them out, or you can also listen through their own internal audibly have different audible reach like hoopla, I think is one of them. And so just gain that and just learn and continuously learn different skill sets. And so because as you continue to build your career trajectory, and all your own skills matrix, you never know what's ahead. And so there's nothing wrong with using HR, but also you have photography, you don't know how that's going to marry each other later in the future. So I would be careful when people say, Oh, my gosh, Kara, you're all over the place. And it's like, no, this is my passion, this is my purpose. And they're going to somehow be married at some point, honestly, it will all fall into place. And it's, you'll see that alignment, and it's such a beautiful process. And then also note, start to identify what you don't like, I think we're such a salt we consume of all this information, and be okay with telling people like that's a hot mess. Like that even makes sense. Because some people just say things, and there's no data behind it. There's just it's a perspective, it doesn't mean just learn how to filter the negativity. And that doesn't have anything to do with your with what's ahead for you. So learn how to just filter that out and just be like, hmm, that sounds like that was your experience. And sounds like that's not going to work for me. And then but I think that's one thing that definitely as leaders, you want to you want to have exercise your no muscle in those who are kind kind hearted in a more kind of sweet personality. I said, then you really have to exercise the hell no muscle. And so learning that right? And so it's not just like no, because then you'll come off very kind and it might not be as firm. And so they go, what do you say the way God I don't say it that way. But you may have to exercise that in your heart that way. So that you can come be more confident because what what's a beautiful process, if I can share this curious that is seeing professionals learn their skill set, and then being able to design and create what's ahead. Like they're in full control of that, right. So it's not only a graduate college or establish or career, we take whatever we can get to get it to take a position to take a job to pay, you know, to pay our bills, or then later take care of our family. But as you advance, you get to choose what you like, you get to be the HR director and be like, Yeah, no, I don't do payroll. I have a team who does that. That's how I roll. And it's awesome. Like you don't you don't you can know how to do it, you can be an expert. So I am great at administration, I'm great at taking notes. I type I think 90 words a minute, like I don't know, some crazy amount. And like I I'm very fast at processing it, but I will not do it or use. And so I tell them, no, I don't do that. And they're like, really, I'm there if you're good at it. And I'm just not gonna do that. And so I like to absorb information and be around people. And there's other gifts that you that I have that I would rather use towards the team. And so and move the team in that way. They feel like you know, and there's and everybody has a talent and gift. And so just because you're good at that doesn't mean you have to exercise that. And so that's what's the beauty of designing what's ahead is you get to pick and choose from all the skill set and all the all the gifts that you have for your future. So and as a leader, that's why they pay you more.

Host - Kerry Rosado:

Well, thank you for sharing all those perspectives. I appreciate you highlighting the importance of building those relationships through networking, finding mentors, because that's essential, especially if you want to level up so I appreciate all that. And the resources you mentioned, as far as you know, obviously books and podcasts but it really depends on your learning style right? What you what you like to absorb? And how so thank you for all of that. What are the best ways the audience can stay in touch with you and learn more about you and the work that you do your organization? Yeah.

Guest - Leena Mendoza:

So I met Lena Mendoza comm so l e ma, ma n di oca.com. I'm on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and do Tick Tock as well. And so now we're doing clubhouse. And so learning a lot from clubhouse it's definitely a very powerful platform. And so definitely love to stay connected. I love to share resources. I think there's so much for us to leverage with each other. I think that's one thing that's so important about building relationships. And so any resources that I can be helpful to help someone advance, you know, I may have it in maybe a PDF somewhere or something I created. And so I'd love to share that with the audience as well. I think it's very important that we start thinking about what's best for us. And so, you know, I think and that's what I love to do is like, I'm like, Girl, is this something you need? Like, let's make sure you're getting a $50,000 raise. And you're like, that's a lot of like, Yeah, but so it was a drama they put you through, so let's level up and let's make that happen. And I think it's time for us to be unapologetic about pay parity and what's rightfully owed to us, right? And it's sometimes we're just we feel like, well, it's, you know, I need to earn that. And but I know that people have already earned that they're already excellent. And so it's time for us to ask for what's what's fair. And so, you know, I always encourage you go, man, you're relentless at that. I said, Yes, I am. And so it's for your family, essentially. So that's why I say that.

Host - Kerry Rosado:

Thank you so much for all sharing your expertise in leadership, any last words for the audience, as far as leadership goes, that you'd like to share?

Guest - Leena Mendoza:

Sure, I would, actually. So I, you know, as I shared the definition, is of leadership. So my definition of leadership is to, you know, lead with humbleness and humility, and my encouragement to others is to define what leadership means to you. And so what is, you know, how you impact how you influence. And as you gain mentors, my encouragement to others is to also be a mentor, mentor other people who need that help, the way we are going to advance together is when we help each other and leverage that leadership together. And don't be afraid to ask for help. I think that's sometimes kind of it's hard, right? It's humbling because it's, it's a vulnerability. And so ask for help. And so this is the time for us to lock arms together and continue to be a champion for one another. That's that's the best thing we can do for each other as leaders.

Host - Kerry Rosado:

Well, thank you so much for that and to our audience. Just a reminder to join our continue to listen to our podcast, which is available on Spotify, Apple podcast, and now also on amazon music. And to also subscribe to our new YouTube channel, the divergent changemakers available on YouTube. So check that out if you're more of a visual person and rather see the video then listen to the podcast. So yeah, thank you so much for listening. And thank you so much for joining us today. Lena. Thank you.